Summer Reading 2014

Looking for some good summer reads? We asked some friends to help us put together a reading list on the topic of faith and service!

 
Mercy in the City - How to Feed the Hungry, Give Drink to the Thirsty, Visit the Imprisoned, and Keep Your Day Job By Kerry Weber, Loyola Press, 2014
When Jesus asked us to feed the hungry, give drink to the thirsty, and visit the imprisoned, he didn’t mean it literally, right? Kerry Weber, a modern, young, single woman in New York City sets out to see if she can practice the Corporal Works of Mercy in an authentic, personal, meaningful manner while maintaining a full, robust, regular life. Weber, a lay Catholic, explores the Works of Mercy in the real world, with a gut-level honesty and transparency that people of urban, country, and suburban locales alike can relate to. Mercy in the City is for anyone who is struggling to live in a meaningful, merciful way amid the pressures of “real life.”
 
 
In the Company of the Poor – Conversations with Paul Farmer and Fr. Gustavo Gutierrez, Orbis Books, 2013
This book reflects intersection between the lives, commitments, and strategies of two highly respected figures Dr. Paul Farmer and Fr. Gustavo Gutierrez joined in their option for the poor, their defense of life, and their commitment to liberation. Farmer has credited liberation theology as the inspiration for his effort to do social justice medicine, while Gutierrez has recognized Farmer's work as particularly compelling example of the option for the poor, and the impact that theology can have outside the church. This book draws on their respective writings, major addresses by both at Notre Dame, and a transcript of a dialogue between them.
 
Jesus: A Pilgrimage By Fr. James Martin, HarperOne, 2014
Combining the fascinating insights of historical Jesus studies with profound spiritual insights about the Christ of faith, Father Martin recreates the world of first-century Galilee and Judea to usher you into Jesus's life and times and show readers how Jesus speaks to us today. Martin also brings together the most up-to-date Scripture scholarship, wise spiritual reflections, and lighthearted stories about traveling through the Holy Land with a fellow (and funny) Jesuit, visiting important sites in the life of Jesus of Nazareth.
 
 
 
A Willing Heart: How to Serve When You Think You Can't By Marci Alborghetti, Ave Maria Press, 2011
Marci Alborghetti weaves together wisdom, humor, personal stories, and a series of attainable goals in this vision of Christian action that is at once a beautiful meditation on spiritual growth and a common-sense guide to discovering practical ways to serve. What began with a traumatic home robbery became Marci Alborghetti's first step on a journey toward a deep commitment to Christian service. Part spiritual memoir and part exhortation, A Willing Heart is for anyone who feels overwhelmed at the prospect of one more item on the weekly calendar, and for those who worry that they might not have much to offer.
 
 
A Good Man: Rediscovering My Father, Sargent Shriver By Mark Shriver, Henry Colt and Co., 2012
When Sargent "Sarge" Shriver—founder of the Peace Corps and architect of President Johnson's War on Poverty—died in 2011 after a valiant fight with Alzheimer's, thousands of tributes poured in from friends and strangers worldwide. These tributes, which extolled the daily kindness and humanity of "a good man," moved his son Mark far more than those who lauded Sarge for his big-stage, headline-making accomplishments. After a lifetime searching for the path to his father's success in the public arena, Mark instead turns to a search for the secret of his father's joy, his devotion to others, and his sense of purpose. Mark discovers notes and letters from Sarge; hears personal stories from friends and family that zero in on the three guiding principles of Sarge's life—faith, hope, and love—and recounts moments with Sarge that now take on new value and poignancy.
 
 
Strangers at My Door: A True Story of Finding Jesus in Unexpected Guests By Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove, Convergent Books, 2013
His first followers knew that Jesus could be found with the fatherless, the widows, and the hungry and homeless. He said that he himself was a stranger, and commended those who welcomed him. If he really meant these things, what would happen if you opened your door to every person who came with a need? Jonathan and Leah Wilson-Hartgrove decided to find out. The author and his wife moved to the Walltown neighborhood in Durham, North Carolina, where they have been answering the door to anyone who knocks. When they began, they had little idea what might happen, but they counted on God to show up. In Strangers at My Door, Wilson-Hartgrove tells of risks and occasional disappointments. But far more often there is joy, surprise, and excitement as strangers become friends, mentors, and helpers.
 
 
 
Do you have any books to add to our list? Send your suggestions to Katie Mulembe at [email protected].
 
 
 
 
 
Shared Visions is a collaborative effort of Catholic Volunteer Network and Catholic Apostolate Center.